Does every arteriole constrict the same?


"No, arteriolar constriction to extrinsic and/or intrinsic inputs (e.g., sympathetic neurotransmission and/or myogenic control respectively) can vary within individual arteriolar networks and across different organ/tissues. One example--- within a skeletal muscle arteriolar network, the magnitude and sensitivity of arteriolar constrictor responses to sympathetic ligands (NE, NPY, and ATP) are dependent on arteriolar order (i.e., where the arterioles are situated in the network).” – Dwayne Jackson, University of Western Ontario
"Certainly not. Not only are there profound differences in the reactivity of arterioles between different organs, there are substantial and important gradients in reactivity among sequential branching orders of arterioles within a given vascular tree. The latter phenomenon was extensively studied by MCS pioneers such as Zweifach and Metz (Microvasc Res, 1955) and Gore (Am J Physiol, 1972)." – Michael Davis, University of Missouri
 "Constriction or dilation of arterioles displays variation based on vascular bed and metabolic status. Even within the same vascular bed, we often observed a phenomenon of graded response threshold in the vasoreactivity of arterioles originating from the same artery when exposed to vasoactive agents.” – Prasad Katakam, Tulane University

"Certainly not. Not only are there profound differences in the reactivity of arterioles between different organs, there are substantial and important gradients in reactivity among sequential branching orders of arterioles within a given vascular tree. The latter phenomenon was extensively studied by MCS pioneers such as Zweifach and Metz (Microvasc Res, 1955) and Gore (Am J Physiol, 1972)." – Michael Davis, University of Missouri

"Absolutely not! Context is key. Arterioles are equipped to respond to the huge range of stimuli that are specific to their local environment, be that brain or bladder, and will thus behave differently depending on where they are. Even within the same organ, regional variations can confer different properties on the local arterioles.” – Thomas Longden, University of Vermont
"There are regional differences (i.e., longitudinal gradients) in the determinants of constriction between proximal and distal arteriolar branches including: transmural pressure and wall stress, myogenic tone, perivascular innervation and interactions with the extracellular matrix as well as the functional distribution of gap junctions, ion channels and receptors in smooth muscle and endothelial cells. Distal branches can constrict to completely obliterate the lumen whereas proximal branches typically do not attain closure; such differences apply to arteriolar networks of a given vascular bed as well as to differences between vascular beds supplying different organs.” – Steven Segal, University of Missouri
”I would say No to that. If a vascular network is, by design structurally heterogeneous, then arterioles must retain different levels of tone to ensure that blood flow is similar among all the distal capillaries.” – Donald Welsh, University of Western Ontario
"The basic molecular mechanisms that regulate smooth muscle cell contractility are highly conserved between arterioles from different vascular beds but the mechanisms controlling those pathways greatly varies, particularly for highly specialized tissues such as the brain or skin. So, no, every arteriole does not constrict the same.” – Scott Earley, University of Nevada
"An arteriole constricts differently based on its surrounding environment, and whether or not it is observed in vivo, or in an isolated vessel preparation. For the in vivo case at least, the short answer to this question is "no, each arteriole constricts differently based on its arteriolar order and resting diameter”, and it may help to rather ask how each arteriole, for a given bifurcation, within a vascular network constricts (i.e., to consider up/down-stream effects).” – Baraa Al-Khazrajii, University of Western Ontario
"Across different vascular beds, arterioles demonstrate heterogeneity in their vasoconstrictor responsiveness based on the vasoconstrictor/vasodilatory stimuli in the microenvironment and their spatial arrangement in a given microvascular network.” – Nicole Novielli, University of Guelph